Well, there’s not a lot that one can say at this point. Things are changing all around us. Decisions are being made (or not made) and quality communication has become difficult to find. With that in mind, we’ve made the decision at DLRC to not attend the upcoming Whitman Baltimore Expo. For those of you wondering, the show has not been canceled as of yet, but in an abundance of caution, we think that it’s the right move for DLRC. Keeping the folks that make DLRC great away from danger as much as possible is what we’ve determined is the best course of action. For those of you attending the event (if it still occurs), we’re sorry that we’ll miss you, but we’ll be back in the Summer!

If you have coins that you’re looking to sell, we may not be able to get them from you in Baltimore, but we work even more flexibly via mail and would be happy to discuss your needs on the phone. If the collection is of a higher value, we’ll even cover the shipping or insurance. We’re all about serving you, the collector. And while we can’t do that on the road right now, we can certainly do so from our office!

Please don’t hesitate to reach out to us if we can be of assistance, please check out our blog for our most recent posts, and lastly, we hope that you enjoy the coins listed below. We’re still open in our comfortable office building in Virginia and we have plenty of soap and water on hand.

If you have any questions regarding DLRC, the coin industry, or the coin collecting hobby, email them to coingroup@davidlawrence.com and they might be featured in a future edition of my blog column “Just Ask John.”


Numismatically Yours,
John Brush and Your Friends at DLRC

Why we love it:This coin is freshly graded from a collection put together in the early 1900s, and we dare say it may be the nicest piece out there for the grade. With amazingly clean surfaces and stunning original toning, you’ll be hard-pressed to find a comparable coin. This is a true highlight for any collection or auction and a fantastic opportunity for a collector to acquire a true “put back” coin to hold on to for years.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide puts this example at $100,000, and the CPG suggests $84,700. We’re starting this new-to-market piece at $97,500, and we expect it to exceed both price guides. The last coin of this grade and type sold in 2015, so it may be quite a while before another comes up for sale.

Why we love it:One of only seven full red pieces graded by PCGS, this example is sharply struck with frosted reddish-pink tints and strong luster. We think it should have graded MS65, but that just means you have the opportunity for a fantastic deal.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide suggests $18,000, and the CPG doesn’t list prices for Red examples. We’re willing to sell it for just $13,500 via Make Offer. On the high end of the grade, this beauty is an absolute steal for the price.

Why we love it:With only two graded higher at NGC, this piece is an impeccably preserved element of Civil War history. A very common date, this coin would make an excellent addition to a type set. Both sides are sharply struck and dripping in satiny luster.
Value:The NGC Price Guide and CPG both put this example at $8,000, while the PCGS Price Guide is way out at $12,500. We’re sticking to the lower end and starting this one off at just $6,500, well below any of the guides.

Why we love it:This satiny brown beauty is an excellent type coin, with faint hints of luster hiding in the protected areas. It’s a common date, making it an affordable option for a type set. High end for the grade with CAC approval, this evenly toned example won’t disappoint.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide puts this piece at $2,100, and the CPG suggests $2,500. We’ll sell it for $2,400 via Make Offer, so don’t miss out on this gorgeous coin as it nears its 200th birthday.

Why we love it:If you like proof three cent pieces, do yourself a favor and take a close look at this one – Proof 67 with a population of seven and none higher. From an original mintage of only 510 pieces, this piece has bold contrast between the fields and frosted devices, all covered in a light golden-pink tint. Sharply struck with no noticeable marks, this coin is absolutely stunning.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide suggests $7,500, and the CPG is at $6,250. We’ll let it go for just $5,250, well below either. The last auction for a PCGS graded example was in 1997, so it’s likely to be quite a while before you see another one of these on the market.

Why we love it:The mintage numbers of the 1873 closed 3 are in debate, though most sources estimate somewhere between 100 and 300 pieces. Regardless, this is undoubtedly a key of the $3 series in any grade. This is a nice AU example with even color and a bit of prooflike luster left around the devices.
Value:The NGC Price Guide puts this piece at $16,700, the PCGS Price Guide at $15,000, and the CPG at $14,500. We’re starting it at $14,000, below even the CPG. This gives you a fantastic opportunity to get a true rarity at a great price, so don’t let this one slip by!

Why we love it:This beautifully original piece has deep tones of pink, blue, and rose hiding its smooth underlying luster. It’s undoubtedly high end for the grade, as evidenced by the CAC approval. This common date issue would make a fantastic addition to a type set.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide puts this coin at $4,500, and the CPG suggests $4,120. We’re making it available for just $3,750 via Make Offer. The last auction of a PCGS example of this grade was in 2016, so it may be awhile before another comes on the market.

Why we love it:This key date is an absolute gem with full red surfaces and original luster. The 1909-S VDB is always in strong demand as one of the top key dates in the very widely collected wheat penny series, and with a mintage of under 500,000, there are never quite enough to go around. Considered a “blue chip” issue amongst most numismatists, we love it when a gem quality coin comes our way! This is a chance to own not just an S VDB, but a beautiful, stunning example that’s sure to be a highlight of your collection.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide puts this piece at $10,000, and the CPG suggests $9,380. We’re starting it off at just $8,750, well below the most recent auction which realized $10,200 in February.

Why we love it:With only one graded finer, this satiny gem is just about as good as it gets. One of the rarer dates in the three cent nickel series, this piece has incredibly clean fields and an even matte-like appearance. This example is just begging to be added to a registry set.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide puts this coin at $4,000, and the CPG suggests $3,750. We’re making it available for $3,000 via Make Offer. All major auction records since 2013 have been higher than this, making it an amazing deal that you’re unlikely to find again anytime soon.

Why we love it:This flashy gem is a conditional rarity, with a population of five and only two graded higher. Absolutely dripping with luster, the fields are clean with no distracting marks. This is a phenomenally well-preserved piece from the Roaring Twenties.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide puts this coin at $4,800, while the CPG tops out at MS66. We’ll let this one go for just $4,250, which is an absolute steal. It last sold in April of 2017 for $6,463. With a plus grade and CAC approval, you know this gem is teetering on the edge of the next grade up.

Why we love it:This popular first year of the type is a stunning gem. The sharply struck devices are coated in a thick mint frost and even medium-gold surfaces. With no distracting marks, this issue is undoubtedly on the high end of the assigned grade.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide puts this piece at $10,500, and the CPG suggests $6,690 in MS66. We’re starting it at $8,250, leaving plenty of room for bids. The last equivalent coin sold in December of 2019 for $9,106.

Why we love it:A popular variety among shield nickel collectors, this piece has a population of two with only one graded higher for the variety. The single finer example realized of $13,800 in auction, and we expect some excitement over this one as well. The surfaces are clean with light evidence of circulation, still crisply detailed and with strong eye appeal.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide puts this coin at $5,500 in AU55. We’re offering it for $5,000 via Make Offer, giving you a chance to own this scarce variety at quite a bargain.

Why we love it:This stunning toner is awash in vibrant blue, rose, and orange hues. With a strong strike and virtually flawless surfaces, you’ll be hard-pressed to find a more eye-catching specimen. It has a population of three with only two finer.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide suggests $7,750, and the CPG is at $7,500. We’re starting it at $6,500, leaving plenty of room for bids. Don’t miss out on this registry quality gem!

Why we love it:With a huge jump in price in MS66, this piece is a gorgeous and affordable type coin. Pale copper surfaces typical of copper-nickel cents abound while smooth fields and sharply struck devices offer full detail in the eagle’s feathers. A popular first year of type, and the first small cent, this piece is sure to go fast.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide recommends $3,150, and the CPG is at $3,000. We’re making it available for only $2,850 via Make Offer, below either price guide. This eagle is just waiting to fly into your hands!
Why we love it:With a population of two and none higher for the variety, this beautifully original piece is sure to turn some heads. With golden brown toning and clear fields, this example is well struck with fantastic eye appeal.
Value:A rather specific variety, neither the PCGS Price Guide nor the CPG have a specific value for this issue. We’re willing to let it go for just $3,000, which is a fantastic deal for a top pop coin with such strong eye appeal. This one won’t last long!

Why we love it:With a population of 13 with only one higher in DMPL, this coin is a stunner for sure. The flashy fields highlight thickly frosted devices with sharp contrast. Sharply struck, this example has magnificent eye appeal and is perfectly suited to a registry set.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide suggests $8,500, and the CPG is at $5,000. We’re starting it off at only $4,500, just over half of the PCGS recommendation. These don’t come up for sale very often; the last public auction of this grade was in 2009. This has the potential to be an amazing deal for a lucky bidder, so keep an eye out.

Why we love it:This popular variety is clear enough to be seen with minimal magnification, the doubling easily visible to the east of the date and the last three letters of LIBERTY. This example is a bright, even red with plenty of luster and fantastic eye appeal.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide recommends $3,200, and the CPG suggests $3,380. We’ll let it go for $2,900, below either. The auction record for the grade is held by a piece which sold in 2018 for $9,000.

Why we love it:This 1801 2 Escudos may be lightly circulated, but it’s still stunning. The surfaces are a pale gold and toned slightly darker around some devices, highlighting them. The wear is light and even with plenty of detail left, particularly on the reverse. This is a scarce gold doubloon issue and a fascinating part of history.
Value:The NGC Price Guide suggests $950 in MS60, with no prices listed between XF and MS. We’re offering it at $825, but you’re welcome to send us an offer – we’ve had this one on our shelves for a little while and would love to see it find a home.