As mentioned last time, you can find us in Atlanta, Georgia this week, attending the ANA show at the Cobb Galleria Center. This location is attached to a popular hotel that is actually home to one of the largest coin shows that I remember from my childhood. My parents and I drove to the Waverly Hotel to attend a show on Saturday, February 11, 1989. I remember it well because it was my birthday!

I was working on a Buffalo Nickel collection, but on this day my father and I sat down with an ancient coin dealer and my dad bought me a Tiberius Caesar Silver Denarius. Why? Because he remembered having one as a kid and it held special significance to him due to the religious history behind the issue. As a coin that was likely issued during the time of Jesus, it was a great coin for a young collector that he could bring to Sunday School the next day. I actually still have the coin. So, this location brings back a lot of memories for me. We’ve attended several shows here since, but it’s nice to be back. Having lived a year in Atlanta, I’m also thrilled to come back to the home of my Braves and to have a few nice BBQ dinners at places from my childhood. It’ll probably be the cheapest “show-related” dinners we’ll have this year, but perhaps the best-tasting!


We have an excellent table location right at the front of the room, so the activity has been delightfully consistent. With most of the opening day activity being relegated to wholesale and buying related transactions for DLRC, we’re looking forward to the addition of collectors throughout the day Thursday and Friday! While no record sales have occurred just yet, we have been able to buy quite a bit and so far have had a great show! We’ll continue to work hard through Friday evening and see if anything else interesting shows up, but if you read this in time and want to come down on Friday morning, let us know. You can find us right inside the entrance of the show!

Sincerely,
John Brush and Your Friends at DLRC


Why we love it:With fewer than 40 examples graded in total at PCGS, this key Bust Quarter is a rare find indeed. The variety was created when the die cutter accidentally punched 50c on the die, then covered it with 25c without any clear efforts to remove traces of the first punch. This piece is nicely circulated with even wear and coloring which highlights the devices.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide suggests $35,000, while the CPG is at $33,900. With only seven graded higher, even this circulated coin is among the better examples extant. We’re starting it off at $32,000, which should leave plenty of room for specialists to bid. Don’t miss out on this truly rare key piece.

Why we love it:One of the highest mintage S-mint Peace dollars, this beauty is a true conditional rarity. Most are found in MS63 or lower due to weak strike and significant bag marks. The piece has remarkably clear fields and satiny white luster, with even the original die polish lines still visible. This Peace Dollar is begging to be part of a registry set.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide estimates $38,500, and the CPG comes in at $36,300. We’ve decided to leave plenty of headroom on this one and start it at only $24,000, giving you the opportunity to own this gorgeous white gem at quite a bargain.

Why we love it:This is a fantastic example of a key Lincoln cent. A rare date in any grade, the 1914 D is even harder to find in full red. This gorgeous specimen is covered in silky luster with hints of gold across the smooth fields. There’s a steep price jump in MS66, making this coin a great value for any high-grade collection.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide puts this piece at $14,000, and the CPG suggests $13,300. We’re willing to let it go for just $11,500 via Make Offer. We’ve sold two other MS65 example in 2012 and 2009 which realized $11,250 and $14,365, respectively.

Why we love it:From a mintage of only 575, this piece is strikingly toned in splashes of gold and seafoam green. Only five examples are graded higher at PCGS, topping out at MS68. From one of the lowest original mintages of proof Barber quarters, this coin is quite the looker and will undoubtedly find a seat in a registry set.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide puts this piece at $3,350, and the CPG suggests $3,000. We believe the gorgeous toning and Hansen pedigree put this example above the crowd and will let it go for $3,500 via Make Offer. You simply won’t find a better example for the grade..

Why we love it:This red-brown beauty has a population of only two with none higher and is the plate coin on CoinFacts. The devices positively glow with a halo of strong red luster that fades into chocolate fields. If you’re looking for an eye-catching piece, this stellar large cent certainly fits the bill.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide suggests $10,500. There’s only one auction record for the grade, which was for the other example that had less eye appeal than this fine piece. We think PCGS is low on this one and are starting it at $15,525. Who knows when either example will come back on the market, so don’t miss out on this one while it’s available!

Why we love it:From an original mintage of only 510, this beauty is one of the finest examples extant. None are graded higher without a cameo designation, and those three are all in PR67+ CAM. Even without the designation, this piece shows plenty of contrast between the devices and reflective fields and has a light golden-pink tint.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide puts this coin at $7,500, and the CPG suggests $6,250. We’re willing to sell this one for just $5,500 via Make Offer. The last time a PCGS piece of this grade came up for public auction was in 1997, so it’s not very often that you’ll have chance to buy one like this. Act fast while it’s still available!

Why we love it:This is a nice representative example for the issue. With light wear from handling and plentiful abrasions, as is expected for the date, this piece is ideal if you want an example that reflects the expected quality for the date. The date as a whole is scarce but is incredibly rare in MS grades; only a few exist above AU58.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide suggests $35,000, and the CPG comes in at $33,900. We’re willing to let it go for just $28,500 via Make Offer. Don’t miss this opportunity to fill a rare date in your collection with a great example.

Why we love it:This easily identifiable variety was created when a die engraver placed “United” too high on the reverse die, forcing them to remove the spaces in “States of America,” such that it appears as one word. This same reverse die was reused in 1820, but the 1814 was the first instance of it. Very few MS examples have survived, and this AU58 piece has a population of only three with four higher at PCGS. With some light toning around the rims, this coin has strong eye appeal, smooth fields, and no distracting marks.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide puts this issue at $15,000, and the CPG is at – bafflingly – only $2,750. The two most recent auctions for PCGS-graded specimens in this grade realized $2,116 in 2006 and $17,038 in 2017, indicating that the rarity of high grades for this variety is a newer discovery. We’re starting this piece at $14,150, expecting a result more in line with the 2017 auction.

Why we love it:This is a gorgeous example of an early matte proof. Plenty of original red is still present, and the matte finish is clear to see. Both sides have a few hints of pale crimson toning. A nice original piece, this would be a lovely addition to any Lincoln cent collection.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide suggests $1,350, and the CPG isn’t far off at $1,380. If you use Make Offer, we’re willing to let this one go for only $1,050. We last sold an equivalent example in 2017 for $1,250.

Why we love it:This is a stunning example of a very low-mintage proof. From an original mintage of only 510 pieces, this coin has subtle hints of rose, blue, and gold toning in its clearly mirrored fields. The devices are strongly frosted, giving it fantastic eye appeal and an undeniable cameo. With only one graded finer regardless of cameo designation, this piece is certainly one of the best examples to survive.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide puts this coin at $11,000. We think they’re probably pretty spot-on, but we’re starting it at $10,000 to give some room for bidding. The last two auctions have realized $15,000 and $20,563, so we have every reason to expect a lot of interest in this nickel.

Why we love it:This intriguing mint mark variety was created when a reverse die intended for the Carson City Mint changed course before being sent for minting and wound up at San Francisco. There are a number of similar mint mark varieties across different series, but this is the only such variety recognized for trade dollars. As a result, this is an issue consistently in demand. This particular example is dripping with luster and golden toning around the rims.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide puts this piece at $15,500 and the CPG suggests $16,900. We’re offering it as part of our Vault Value auction with a starting bid of only $14,250. This is an opportunity to get a key Trade Dollar at a real bargain, so don’t miss out on this auction.

Why we love it:A very scarce date in full red, this gorgeous specimen is one of the best examples you’ll find. With smooth fields and well-struck devices we think it should have graded MS65, but regardless of grade, there’s no denying the eye appeal of this beauty. The luster borders on pink, giving it a soft glow that begs a second look..
Value:The PCGS Price Guide suggests $18,000. The last piece sold at auction realized $14,100 in 2013, and we’re willing to accept a touch under that – just $14,000 – via Make Offer. With a population of two with only five finer, these don’t come up for sale very often.

Why we love it:This DMPL Morgan is absolutely stunning with thickly frosted devices and liquid mirrors. Covered in a delicate champagne patina, this coin has a population of six with only one finer. The single finest piece is now part of the primary Hansen collection, meaning this beauty is now up for grabs.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide puts this dollar at $9,500 without the Hansen pedigree. We believe it’s a very strong coin for the grade, and with the added pedigree, have decided to start it at $10,850. The last auction record for a PCGS-graded example was in 2012 and realized $14,950, so it’s been quite awhile since an issue like this appeared on the market.

Why we love it:This frosty gem is ideal for a type set. A popular last year of issue, it’s an absolutely superb example of a very common date. It is fully lustrous with clear, well-struck devices and white surfaces. With only a light golden tint, there’s nothing distracting about this coin; it will fit in beautifully with any registry-quality type or Barber dime set.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide suggests $2,150, while the CPG is at $1,620. We’ll let it go for just $1,700 via Make Offer. With only three graded finer, all in MS67+, you won’t find a piece much better than this one.

Why we love it:Notoriously a softly struck issue, this gold dollar is also a key date of the series with an original mintage of only 3,200. Only 300 are believed to survive, and only 20 in MS65 or higher. That puts this coin in the upper echelons of a very scarce date and makes it a must-see for any collectors of $1 gold pieces.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide puts this piece at $5,500. We expect that they’re pretty spot-on, but we’re starting it at $4,650 as part of this week’s Vault Value auction. We’ve never had the pleasure of offering this date at such a high grade before.
Why we love it:This better date New Orleans half dollar is among the best examples surviving with a population of only three with four finer. It has a wild splash of cyan, royal blue, magenta, and orange on the obverse, with hints of the same colors on the reverse.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide is at $8,500, and the CPG suggests $9,380. Both of these are standard estimates that don’t take the stunning toning into consideration, but we’re starting it at just $7,500 anyway to give you plenty of room to bid.

Why we love it:This brown beauty would make an excellent addition to a type set. Crisply struck devices are surrounded by traces of red luster amidst a sea of chocolate brown. The 1853 is a common date and not unusually rare in high grades, making this a fantastic high-grade option at a low price for any type collection.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide puts this piece at $850, and the CPG suggests $780. We’re expecting somewhere in the ballpark of $775, but it’s currently up for a no reserve auction closing on March 8. At the time of publishing the bid is only at $110, so there’s a chance to swoop in and get this beauty at an amazing bargain. Be sure to keep an eye on this one!!

Why we love it:An underrated date, the 1918 D Buffalo nickel is among the 15 rarest issues in the series. This lightly circulated and problem-free example still has some luster hiding in protected areas, and there are no distracting marks.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide puts this coin at $275, and the CPG suggests $256. We’re asking $275, but will let it go for even less via Make Offer. We last sold a similar piece in 2017 for $230.

Why we love it:This frosty gem is dripping in bright white luster. With clear fields and a sharp strike, you’ll be hard-pressed to find fault with this high-grade beauty. As a common date, this would be a good choice for a type set, or any high-end Buffalo nickel set.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide puts this piece at $650, and the CPG suggests $585. We think it’s high-end for the grade and are asking $700.

Why we love it:This Capped Bust half dollar is fully original and has strong eye appeal for the grade. It’s worn evenly such that the devices are highlighted. There’s still plenty of detail on both sides, with no distracting marks or toning. This is exactly what you want from an XF40 coin.
Value:The PCGS Price Guide suggests $350, and the CPG is at $358. We sold a comparable piece just last month for $340 and are asking $375 for this one.