First of all, we hope that everyone is staying healthy. This has been an odd time for all of us, but it has forced us to pause and to consider what is most important. We’ve appreciated all of your kind thoughts and understanding as we continue to weave our way through the difficulties presented. We are thankful for the opportunity to serve other collectors and to be involved in a hobby for which we have such passion. We’ve been thrilled to see the number of orders that have been jumping out of our offices after another busy weekend and we’re excited about the long weekend ahead. Memorial Day is a special time for our community as we are surrounded by military service members and are all familiar with some that have given the ultimate sacrifice for our country. We are thankful for their service and we want to remember them on this important holiday. For DLRC it’s also a special time of remembrance as our founder, David Lawrence Feigenbaum passed away on May 25th, 2002 from Lou Gehrig’s Disease (ALS). As we look back on this date we remind ourselves to honor his legacy of always putting the collector first.

So, what have we been doing this week? We unveiled a great little group of Morgan Dollars, The Danville Collection, that will be ending on the 31st of May, and we’ve processed our usual number of coins for our upcoming auctions.

You also might see our latest update to the website. We’ve renovated our homepage to make it easier to find categories of coins that might be of interest. Although it’s largely a cosmetic change in an attempt to make browsing a bit easier, I’d appreciate any feedback that you might have!

All of that being said, we hope that you find something interesting, whether here, on our website, or in our current auctions. If you have any questions over the holiday weekend, don’t hesitate to shoot us an email!

Thanks for reading!

Numismatically Yours,
John Brush


Why we love it: This coin is an absolutely special piece. We’ve attempted to track the provenance of the coin but as it came to us from a small deal, we haven’t been able to trace it. With a population of seven and only one graded finer, this piece features vivid tones of blue, gold, pink, and sea-green. Sharply struck with embossed reliefs, this beauty is a perfect fit for a registry set. We did not submit this coin for a “+” grade or for CAC as it’s very fresh to DLRC! Value: The PCGS Price Guide puts this coin at $28,000, and the CPG suggests $26,600. We’re starting the auction at $24,000, ending this Sunday. This is the first gem example we’ve had the privilege to offer of this date, and with such dramatic toning, this is a must-see for trade dollar lovers.
Why we love it: This stunning gem would make an outstanding type coin. Clear, watery mirrors surround crisply struck and frosted devices, providing incredible contrast between the two. A beautiful yellow-gold throughout, this is one of only 10 cameo examples of the type graded by PCGS. With only two graded finer, this is a truly handsome coin. Value: The PCGS Price Guide suggests $22,500. We’re taking their suggestion and starting the auction at $22,500, ending this Sunday. From a mintage of just 165 pieces, you’ll be hard-pressed to find a nicer example anywhere close to this price point.
Why we love it: Tied with three others for the finest known, this dime is a modern gem. Bright white with light hints of gold on the reverse, this is the only example of the grade at PCGS without significant toning. This makes it the best surviving example for an untoned set, and it is sure to merit a premium. Value: The PCGS Price Guide puts this gem at $4,500. We’re willing to let it go for just $3,750 via Make Offer. With no auction records for other pieces in the grade, this is a rare opportunity to get a top pop coin that would be perfect for a registry set.
Why we love it: Tied for finest known with just one other piece at PCGS, this beauty is all but flawless. The deep, watery mirrors are a sharp contrast to the frosty, crisp devices. Well-struck, blast white, and with no visible marks, this piece would be a perfect fit for a registry set. Value: The PCGS Price Guide doesn’t suggest a price for this grade, but the only auction record is from a 2019 sale that realized $14,687.50 for the same piece now offered. We’re willing to let go of this coin for just $13,500 via Make Offer, well below the last auction record. This is a phenomenal deal for a top pop beauty!
Why we love it: This is a solid example of a rare date seated dollar with much more eye appeal than the grade suggests. Nicely struck with gentle, pleasing luster, the centers are white with light golden tones near the rims. A few nicks are noticeable in the fields, but they are far from distracting and don’t detract from the coin’s excellent eye appeal. Value: The PCGS Price Guide suggests $9,000, and the CPG recommends $10,600. We’re starting this auction at $8,750, ending this Sunday. The last MS60 example to cross the auction block sold in 2017 for $11,750, well above our starting bid.
Why we love it: The most common proof Morgan to be found in cameo, this gem is a perfect fit for a type set. Covered in a light golden tint, the cream-colored devices contrast boldly against the deep, watery fields. From a mintage of 1,355 proofs, this piece has standout eye appeal. Value: The PCGS Price Guide suggests $6,500, and the CPG is at $5,500 without the cameo designation. We’re offering this one today for just $5,800 via Make Offer. Don’t let this golden beauty slip away!
Why we love it: Bordering on prooflike, both sides of this piece are nicely reflective with an attractive yellow-gold patina and rose tints. Well struck with phenomenal eye appeal for the grade, it has nice clean surfaces with no noteworthy marks. Value: The PCGS Price Guide suggests $35,000, and the CPG is at $33,900. We’re making this one available for a mere $28,500 via Make Offer, significantly below either guide. High-end for the grade, this is an unquestionable steal for such an appealing coin.
Why we love it: A key date Carson City half dollar, this piece has solid details for the grade with light, even wear. Less than 200 are believed to survive in any grade, making this a difficult piece to locate for the CC-collectors or the Seated Half specialist. With no distracting marks or toning, this is a strong example that will fit in well with just about any set. Value: The PCGS Price Guide suggests $5,650, and the CPG is at $5,620. We’re starting the auction at just $4,750, ending this Sunday. Only four PCGS-graded examples in XF40 have sold at public auction in the past decade, making this a rare opportunity. Don’t miss out while it’s available!
Why we love it: This is a lovely example of a scarce, early type coin. From a mintage of just 55,578, this is one of just 137 estimated to survive in mint state. An appealing, even gold, this piece is exceptionally lustrous for the grade with no distracting marks. Value: The PCGS Price Guide suggests $13,500, and the CPG is at $11,200. We’re offering this one for just $9,250 via Make Offer. This coin would be a great fit for a type set; it’s a strong, clear example of the type without a rare date or astronomical grade inflating the price.
Why we love it: A common date that’s difficult to find in PL or DMPL, this piece is among the finest surviving with a population of one and only four graded higher. A popular final year of issue, this piece is bright white with nicely mirrored fields and frosted devices. Value: The PCGS Price Guide puts this coin at $4,200, but a specialist can certainly understand the difficulty in locating a piece. It’s even less common than the prooflike 1921-S examples that are VERY tough. With a starting bid at $4,600, ending this Sunday, this coin has never appeared for public auction as graded, and we’re ecstatic to be offering such a high end and fresh-to-market late Morgan.
Why we love it: The lovely No Motto Liberty quarter eagle was once part of the famous Bass Collection, part of which remains intact at the ANA. This example displays clear fields with no distracting marks and nicely struck devices. Only eight are graded finer at NGC. Value: The NGC Price Guide suggests $4,750, and the PCGS Price Guide and CPG both recommend $5,000. We’re going to undercut them all and offer this one for just $4,450 via Make Offer. This is a great opportunity to own a piece of both American and numismatic history.
Why we love it: The first year of issue for the Type 2 Liberty Head double eagle, the 1866 is incredibly rare in mint state with no examples known above MS64. As a result, an AU58 is without a doubt the best bang for your buck, with a sharp strike and some remaining luster alongside a comparatively low price tag. Value: The PCGS Price Guide suggests $6,000, and the CPG is at $5,380. We’re willing to part with this one for just $4,500 via Make Offer. Minted just one year after the end of the Civil War, this nice AU piece will be a lovely addition to your collection.
Why we love it: A popular variety created when a chip fell out of the die, this is a very pleasing example of the Knob Ear Braided Hair Cent. With an even milk-chocolate color and smooth surfaces, this example is well struck with only the slightest wear on the high points. Value: The PCGS Price Guide suggests $300, and the CPG recommends $312. We’re starting this auction at just $260, ending this Sunday. Perfect for an everyman set of large cents, this one is sure to fit in with any brown set.
Why we love it: Pedigreed to the famed Newman Collection, this piece is sharply struck with plenty of luster. The reverse toning is especially appealing, though both sides are subtle and pleasing. The first year of one of America’s most beloved coin designs and previously owned by one of numismatics’ greatest researchers, this spectacular piece is well-deserving of a new home. Value: The NGC Price Guide recommends $1,200, the PCGS Price Guide is at $1,100, and the CPG suggests $1,150. We’re willing to let this one go for just $1,000 via Make Offer. The last NGC example of the grade to sell at auction realized $1,170 in October of 2019.
Why we love it: From a population of just five pieces, this bust dollar is a perfect fit for a lowball type or dollar set. A very popular Millenial issue, the date is easily legible with all other elements only vaguely visible, as expected from a Poor-01. The reverse is all but smooth, while the silhouette of Lady Liberty and some stars can still be made out on the obverse. Value: The PCGS Price Guide suggests $850, though there are no public auction records to reference. We’re making it available for $675 via Make Offer, a fantastic deal on a low population lowball piece.

Check out all of the available "Coins We Love" from past newsletters